The available database comprises research projects in Fisheries, Aquaculture, Seafood Processing and Marine Biotechnology active in the time period 2003-2022.
BlueBio is an ERA-NET COFUND created to directly identify new and improve existing ways of bringing bio-based products and services to the market and find new ways of creating value from in the blue bioeconomy.

More information on the BlueBio project and participating funding organizations is available on the BlueBio website: www.bluebioeconomy.eu

Last Update: 2018/03/29

NA
Fisheries
Age of Deep-Sea Squid
National
National
H.J.T. Hoving
h.j.t.hoving@rug.nl
RuG-CEES MarBEE - University of Groningen; Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies; Marine Benthic Ecology & Evolution (Netherlands)
NA - Not available (Not available)
2010
2013
€ 45,700
NA
The deep sea is the largest, yet least explored, habitat on earth. Evidence is accumulating that deep-sea organisms grow older and slower than their shallow-water relatives. I propose to test this hypothesis for deep-sea squid. These cephalopod molluscs play a key role in marine ecosystems. Coastal squid have an annual life-cycle and the highest growth rates among cold blooded animals. Most squid species inhabit the deep sea. Here they vary in size from a few grams to over 500 kg. Annually sperm whales alone consume more deep-sea squid than the global fisheries catch. In spite of the ecological importance and the enormous production, growth rates of deep-sea squid have not been validated. This is mainly due to practical difficulties of research on deep-sea animals. In the proposed research Remotely Operated Vehicles are used allowing the capture of live squid from the deep ocean. Unique research facilities will allow experiments on living squid in the laboratory and in their natural environment. By validating, quantifying and researching increment deposition in various hard body structures of deep-sea squid my aim is to reconstruct growth rates and with this to gain insight in population turn-over rates and productivity in the deep-sea.
Population structure; Cephalopod; Fish biology;
Southern North Sea (27.IVc)
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